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Is Uganda a collapsing nation?

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Is Uganda a collapsing nation?

The Otherside of the Coin

A street child eating a mango

A street child eating a mango

History reveals that all governments, no matter how grand, no matter how powerful, ultimately fall. It happened to ancient Egypt, Assyria and Babylon.

Even Rome was not exempt; though it dominated much of Europe, Northern Africa, the Middle East and parts of the Near East, and lasted for 500 years, the Roman Empire ultimately fell.

There is an old and popular saying: “Rome was not built in a day.” Likewise, the Roman Empire did not fall in one night; its decline was gradual. Not long after it rose to world dominance, several factors were already at work contributing to the empire’s ultimate demise. Modern super powers like USA are no exceptional. The entire world has had tremendous faith in US dollar and US government debt but all this is withering gradually and steadily.

Why move to the US when we have a fresh example like Uganda?  Just take a look at your own country; you are likely to see signs of a collapsing economy and government. This is not intended to spread pessimism but to stab the conscious of whoever is concerned to do something before things run out of hand. You are aware that once the tipping point comes there will be no chance to put the tooth paste back into the tube.

The collapse of society, government or economy occurs through a number of stages or processes.  Though it can be accelerated by certain events like war, a natural disaster, pandemic, terrorist attack, or even an impending asteroid impact, history has shown that economic collapse will essentially happen in this five stage process.

In the first stage, everything is good and the economy is thriving. A high standard of living has been achieved. Goods are cheap and readily available. Everything seems to be in abundance. Stores are filled with retail items ready to be purchased. The nation’s working infrastructure is solidly intact and working well.

However, the idea that everyone is entitled to have what others have earned now permeates society. Redistribution of Wealth Policies are implemented and quietly woven into the fabric of society. Unchecked and under the guise of fairness and equality, these policies slowly decrease productivity and increase dependency on government entitlement and welfare programs.

When stage two clocks in, the economy goes into a slow but steadily increasing decline. Unemployment is on the rise. Ever increasing numbers of people receive government assistance in one form or another.

People are paid not to work. Government spending has increased dramatically. The price of gold, silver, and other precious metals rise to prices unheard of just a few years earlier. Inflation reaches the double digit level. This stage is called the slippery slope.

The total collapse of the economy begins after a significant and prolonged decline. This is stage three of the collapse. The government implements price controls. Shortages on essential goods become widesprea

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